Canadian Canal Society - Societe des Canaux du Canada
CANADIAN CANALS
On this page you will find a listing of Canadian canals and locks, past and present. More information is provided for many of these, simply click on the link. The canals and/or locks are listed alphabetically by province. If you see any errors in these listings or have more information to add, please contact us at: canadiancanalsociety@gmail.com

Parks Canada map of the National Historic Canals of Canada
(also includes some northern U.S. Canals)
PDF Side 1 (0.98 Mb PDF)
PDF side 2 (0.80 Mb PDF)


To view canal location maps, click on the "view map" link below each section title.

Maritimes Canals & Locks
          (view map)


CANSO CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1955 0.8 mi
1.25 km
1 820' x 80'
250 m x 24 m
28'
8.5 m
variable Open
Notes:

SHUBENACADIE CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1861 -- 9 -- -- -- closed
Notes: Closed in 1870.

ST PETER'S CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1869 0.5 mi
0.80 km
1 300' x 47'
91 m x 14 m
17'
5.2 m
variable Open
Notes:

Quebec Canals & Locks
          (view map)


(Old) BEAUHARNOIS CANAL (see St. Lawrence Seaway for present day)
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1845 14.9 mi
24 km
- -- -- -- closed
Notes: The original Beauharnois canal linked Lake St. Louis with Lake St. Francis on the south side of the St. Lawrence River. It was superceded by the Soulanges Canal in 1899. The present day Beauharnois was built in 1930-1932 and was enlarged in the 1950s as part of the St. Lawrence Seaway system.

CARILLON CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1963 0.5 mi
0.80 km
1 188' x 45'
57 m x 13.7 m
9'
2.7 m
65'
19.8 m
Open
Notes: This lock is part of the Carillon Hydroelectric Dam on the Ottawa River. The first Carillon Canal was completed in 1834 with two locks in a canal cut on the north shore of the Ottawa River. A new canal with larger lock dimensions was built between 1873 and 1882. Today's single lock is operated by Parks Canada. Remains of Lock 1 (1834) and other historic features are part of the Carillon Canal National Historic Site of Canada.

CHAMBLY CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1843 11.8 mi
19 km
9 120' x 23'
36.6 m x 7 m
6.5'
2 m
80'
24.4 m
Open
Notes:

CHUTE À BLONDEAU CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1834 0.16 mi
0.25 km
1 -- -- -- Closed
Notes: Located on the north shore of the Ottawa River at Chute à Blondeau. A timber crib dam built in the late 1800s between Carillon and Chute à Blondeau flooded this canal and the lock was removed.

GRENVILLE CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1882 -- 5 200' x 45'
61 m x 13.7 m
9'
2.7 m
  Closed
Notes: Located on the north shore of the Ottawa River between Greece's Point and Grenville. The first Grenville Canal was opened in 1834 with variable size locks, the smallest being about 107 by 19 feet (33 x 5.8 m). The locks were enlarged between 1873 and 1882. This canal was superceded by the Carillon Dam Lock in 1963.

LACHINE CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1821 8 miles/12.8 kilometers 5 270' x 45'
83 m x 13.7 m
    Open
Notes: The Lachine Canal bypassed the Lachine Rapids on the St Lawrence River. It served as a catalyst for the industrialization of Canada. It was made redundant by the opening of the St Lawrence Seaway in 1959. It has since been revitalized as a recreational waterway.

SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BELLEVUE CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1843 0.12 mi
0.20 km
1 180' x 40'
54.86 m x 12.19 m
9'
2.74 m
variable Open
Notes:

SOULANGES CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1892 14 mi
23 km
5 285' x 46'
86.8 m x 14 m
14 82'
25.2 m
Closed
Notes: The Soulanges Canal provided a canal link from Lake St. Louis to Lake St. Francis on the north side of the St. Lawrence River. It was superceded by the St. Lawrence Seaway in 1959. There is a plan to re-open it as a recreational waterway.

ST LAWRENCE - FIRST CANALS
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1783 -- -- -- -- -- Closed
Notes: The first canals in Canada were built to make the upper St. Lawrence River, between Lake St. Francis and Lake St. Louis, navigable. This included the Coteau du Lac Canal and the Split Rock Canal in 1783, the Trou du Moulin and La Faucille canals in 1785 and the Cascades Canal in 1805. These were superceded by the Beauharnois Canal in 1845.

ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1959 190 mi
306 km
7 768' x 80'
234 m x 24.4 m
30'
9.1 m
211'
64.3 m
Open
Notes: Seven locks and 40 km of canal channels make the St. Lawrence River navigable from Montreal to Lake Ontario. In Quebec, the South Shore Canal contains two locks (St-Lambert and Côte Ste-Catherine) and the Beauharnois Canal also contains two (Upper and Lower Beauharnois locks). In the U.S., New York's Wiley-Dondero Canal contains two locks (Bertrand H. Snell and Dwight D. Eisenhower locks). In Ontario the short Iroquois canal contains 1 lock (Iroquois Lock).

ST OURS CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1849 .12 mi
0.20 km
1 339' x 45'
103 m x 13.7 m
12'
3.7 m
5'
1.5 m
Open
Notes:

Ontario Canals & Locks
          (view map)


BURLINGTON
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
-- -- 0 -- -- -- Open
Notes: connects Lake Ontario to Burlington Bay

GRAND RIVER NAVIGATION
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
-- 52 miles/86.7 kilometers 8 -- -- -- Closed
(derelict)
Notes: a series of locks eventually made the Grand River navigable from Lake Erie to Brantford. There is very little structure left.

HUNTSVILLE (BRUNEL) LOCK
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1874 -- 1 88' x 20'
26.8 m x 6.1 m
-- 8'
2.4 m
Open
Notes:

MAGNETAWAN LOCK
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1998 -- 1 112' x 28'
34 m x 8.5 m
5 -- Open
Notes:

MURRAY CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1889 4.5 mi
7.5 km
- -- -- -- Open
Notes:

MUSKOKA – PORT CARLING LOCKS
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1873

1874
-- 1

1
83' x 12'
25.3 m x 3.7 m
175' x 33'
53.3 m x 10 m
8.5'
2.6 m
8.5'
2.6 m
4'
1.2 m
4'
1.2 m
Open
Notes:

MUSKOKA – PORT SANDFIELD CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1871 - present 200 yds / 180 m 0       open
Notes: In 1865 Alexander P. Pratt took a trip to Muskoka and liked what he saw. In conversation with Darcy McGee, a minister in the pre-confederation government, he said that he would put a steamer on the lakes if the government would open navigation links between Lake Muskoka and Lake Rosseau (Port Carling Lock) and Lake Rosseau and Lake Joseph (Port Sandfield Canal). In 1866, without receiving definite promises, he built the steamship "Wenonah". In the autumn of 1871 the "Wenonah" was to be the first boat through the new canal but it become stuck. Following further dredging the canal opened in 1872.

The steamboat service opened the Muskoka Lakes to development as a luxury wilderness resort area.

The natural outlet for Lake Joseph was through the Joseph River, but it was very narrow in places and had a number of obstructions. The joining of the Lake Joseph and Lake Rosseau through the Port Sandfield Canal lowered the level of Lake Joseph by 18 inches.

NEWMARKET CANAL (Holland River division Trent Canal)
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
never completed (partial construction March 1905 – 5 January 1912) approx. 10 miles 3 142 ft x 23 ft varies approx. 43 ft total never completed
Notes:   

RIDEAU CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1832 125.6 mi
202 km
45 134' x 34'
40.8 m x 10.4 m
5.5'
1.7 m
441'
134.4 m
Open
Notes: The Rideau Canal, a World Heritage Site, links the City of Kingston (Lake Ontario) with the City of Ottawa (Ottawa River). Opened in 1832, it is the oldest continuously operating canal in North America. Now a recreational waterway run by Parks Canada, most of the locks are still operated by hand, just as they were in 1832. Only 10% of this waterway consists of man-made canal-cuts and locks, the rest follows a natural waterway of lakes and rivers. Click here for more details.

SAULT STE MARIE CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1895 1.4 mi
2.22 km
1 900' x 60'
274 m x 18.3 m
18.25'
5.6 m
19'
5.8 m
Open
Notes: This canal connects Lake Huron with Lake Superior. The first lock was built here in 1797 by the British Northwest Fur Company. It was destroyed during during the War of 1812. A new lock was built on the Canadian side in 1895. This was enlarged in 1914, 1943 and then reduced to its present size in 1969.

ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1959 190 mi
306 km
7 768' x 80'
234 m x 24.4 m
30'
9.1 m
211'
64.3 m
Open
Notes: Seven locks and 40 km of canal channels make the St. Lawrence River navigable from Montreal to Lake Ontario. In Quebec, the South Shore Canal contains two locks (St-Lambert and Côte Ste-Catherine) and the Beauharnois Canal also contains two (Upper and Lower Beauharnois locks). In the U.S., New York's Wiley-Dondero Canal contains two locks (Bertrand H. Snell and Dwight D. Eisenhower locks). In Ontario the short Iroquois canal contains 1 lock (Iroquois Lock).

TAY CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1887 6.1 mi
9.8 km
2 134' x 34'
40.8 x 10.4 m
5.5'
1.7 m
25'
7.6 m
Open
Notes: The Tay Canal links the Rideau Canal (Lower Rideau Lake) with the Town of Perth. The first Tay Canal was a private venture by the Tay Navigation Company. Completed in 1834 it consisted of 5 wooden locks along the Tay River, providing a navigation depth of 3.5 feet (1.1 m). It was shut down in 1865. The current canal was built by the Canadian government. It consists of a canal cut from Beveridge Bay on Lower Rideau Lake to the Tay River with two stone locks, built with the same specifications as the locks on the Rideau Canal. These locks were completed in 1887 and continue to operate today.

TRENT-SEVERN CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1920 240 mi
386 km
44 varies 6' to 8'
1.8 m to 2.4 m
858'
261.5 m
Open
Notes: Links Lake Ontario (Bay of Quinte at Trenton) with Lake Huron (Georgian Bay at Port Severn). Features the Big Chute Marine Railway and the Peterborough Lift Lock, the highest hydraulic lock in the world. One of the longest canal construction projects in Canada, the route was first surveyed for a canal in 1833 and the project proceeded in fits and starts. The first through navigation was achieved in July 1920. It operates today as recreational waterway run by Parks Canada.

WELLAND CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1932 27.6 mi
44.4 km
8 859' x 80'
261.8 m x 24.4 m
30'
9.1 m
327'
99.7 m
Open
Notes: The Welland Canal links Lake Ontario with Lake Erie. The first canal in this location opened in 1829 with 35 wooden locks (40 by 1833) and a navigation depth of 8 feet (2.4 m). In 1845 the Second Welland Canal was opened 27 stone locks and a navigation depth of 9 feet (2.7 m). In 1887 the Third Welland Canal opened with 26 stone locks and a navigation depth of 14 feet (4.3 m). The Fourth Welland Canal (present day) was completed in 1932 with 8 locks and a navigation depth of 27 feet (8.2 m), later deepened to 30 feet (9.1 m).

Manitoba Canals & Locks
          (view map)


ST. ANDREWS LOCK
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1910 -- 1 200' x 45'
61 m x 13.7 m
9'
2.7 m
18'
5.5 m
Open
Notes: Located on the Red River between the city of Winnipeg and Lake Winnipeg.

British Columbia Canals & Locks
BAILLIE-GROHMAN'S CANAL
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1889 1.2 mi
2 km
1 100' x 30'
30.5 m x 9.1 m
-- -- Closed
Notes: Located at Canal Flat between the Kootenay and Columbia rivers. It closed in 1902, only having been used twice, by the steamboat Gwendoline in 1894 and by the steamboat North Star in 1902. Unfortunately the North Star was 30 feet (9.1 m) too long for the lock, so the lock was burned down and replaced by two dams. The downstream dam was dynamited, the surge of water locking the boat through.

KEENLEYSIDE DAM LOCK
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1968 -- 1 290' x 50'
88.4 m x 15.2 m
-- -- Open
Notes: Located on the Columbia River, about 8 km upstream from Castlegar.

Yukon Canals & Locks
MARSH LAKE DAM LOCK
Date Current/Last Canal Opened Length Number of Locks Lock Size Minimum Depth Total Liftstatus*
1969 -- 1 12' x 30'
3.7 m x 9.1 m
-- 2' to 8'
0.6 m to 2.4 m
Open
Notes: Located at the headwaters of the Yukon River at Marsh Lake. Hand operated lock for small boats.


* Status denotes whether the canal is still operational (open) or non-operational (closed). It does not denote the operating season of the canal.


Canadian Canal Society
P.O. Box 23016
Carlton PO
145 Carlton St.
St. Catharines, ON L2R 7P6
canadiancanalsociety@gmail.com


Home | About Us | Membership | Publications | Events | Canadian Canals | People | Links


© Canadian Canal Society